Understanding The 6 Essential Nutrients & How To Consume Them

With people focusing on different dietary and physical trends, like building muscle or losing weight, nutritional balance and overall health can be easily forgotten about. First it was fats that were left out of the diet (even healthy ones), and now it’s carbs. But the problem is, although Western diets do need to cut back on simple carbs, the body does need certain healthy carbohydrates to function, along with protein, healthy fats, vitamins, minerals and water. The body cannot synthesize these nutrients on its own, meaning they need to be provided through food every day, and that’s why they are called essential nutrients…

What are the 6 essential nutrients and how to know if you are consuming them



 

What Are Essential Nutrients?

Nutrients are the categories of substance needed in nutrition, and essential nutrients are nutrients that the body cannot produce on its own. They need to be provided through the consumption of food or supplements. Essential nutrients are necessary for the body to be able to function normally, and include carbohydrates, protein, fat, vitamins, minerals and water. Let’s take a closer look at what this means for your daily eating routine and what to do if you are not consuming what you need to…

Essential nutrients


 

Carbohydrates

This is a hot topic at the moment, because carbohydrates are in the bad books when it comes to nutrition and weight loss. The problem when science such as this arises is, it can be taken a step too far, and people do things like cut out carbs altogether, which is detrimental to overall health. What a lot of people don’t realize is that carbohydrates can be extremely healthy, and are found in foods like fruits and starchy vegetables, as well as the more recognizable sources, like grains and bread. Carbs are essential because they are a primary source of energy, helping the brain, central nervous system, kidneys and muscles to function. There are two carbohydrate categories – complex and simple. Complex carbohydrates like whole grains (for example, buckwheat, brown rice and freekeh) and vegetables are better than simple carbs, which you get from anything sugary, including white bread. Vegetables, fruits and whole grains are full of fiber, which reduce the risk of coronary heart disease, while maintaining normal blood glucose levels, lessening the likelihood of sugar crashes and food cravings.

Carbohydrates

Protein

You’d likely be familiar with protein for building muscle and filling you up, but what you might not know is how and why. Protein is the major structural component of cells, and it is responsible for building and repairing tissues in the body. When consumed as food, protein is broken down into amino acids, which are then used as building blocks for protein in the body. Nine out of the 20 amino acids are essential amino acids, because they need to be provided through food and cannot be synthesized in the body. Protein is provided from both animal and plant sources, including meat, eggs, dairy, beans, soy, nuts and legumes. Up to 35 per cent of your daily calorie intake should be lean protein.

Protein

Fat

For a long time, fat was considered the enemy, but that 1990s trend of buying everything ‘low-fat’ or ‘fat-free’ is slowly losing its grip as people realize that fats are good. Having said that thought, many Western diets consume too much fat, and the wrong sorts of fats. When consumed in appropriate amounts, fat is used by the body as a source of energy that increases the absorption of fat-soluble vitamins, such as A, D, E and K. As well as this, fats and oils also insulate the body and cushion the organs from shock. Up to 35 per cent of your daily calorie intake should be a form of fat. Omega-3 is a good example of a healthy fat, and can be found in fish, walnuts, flaxseed and certain vegetable-based oils. Nuts, seeds and avocados are some of the healthiest plant-based fatty foods, while fatty meats and dairy should be consumed in much lower quantities.

Healthy fats

Vitamins

We hear a lot about vitamins and how important they are. The reason you need to consume vitamins every day is to maintain the body functioning, through healthy cells, nerves, skin and tissues. Essential vitamins include A, B, C, D, E and K. Vitamin C, for example, is needed for the body to be able to produce collagen, providing structure to blood vessels, bones and ligaments. Fruits and vegetables, including citrus (like oranges and lemons), strawberries and peppers are excellent sources of vitamin C. Folate, which is a B vitamin, is a vital nutrient, particularly beneficial to women trying to get pregnant. A folate deficiency can potentially cause serious problems, including birth defects and blood diseases. Beans, broccoli, spinach and asparagus are some of the best folate foods, but in some cases, a doctor might recommend people take a folate supplement, especially women trying to get pregnant. 

Vitamins

Vitamin D is another essential vitamin, which helps maintain calcium stability. It can be absorbed from the sun, but, of course, this comes with its own risks, such as melanoma and premature ageing of the skin. This essential nutrient can also be found in some food sources, such as fatty fish (tuna, mackerel and salmon), oranges, beef liver, soy milk, cheese and egg yolks. Vitamin A is needed for healthy skin, protecting against infections, and boosting the immune system. Some food sources include carrots, sweet potato, melons, pumpkin, mangoes, tomatoes, broccoli, and beef liver. Vitamin E helps protect cells from damage and prevents blood clots, thrombosis and atherosclerosis by improving the body’s use of oxygen. It is also good for the skin and improves fertility and wound healing. Some foods with vitamin E include sunflower seeds, peanuts, sesame seeds, peas, sweet potato, wheat germ, tuna and salmon. Lastly, vitamin K helps control blood clotting and is important for bone health. It also assists in preventing heart disease and reducing neural damage. Foods rich in vitamin K include cauliflower, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, lettuce, cabbage, beans, potatoes, tomatoes and peas.

Vitamin D

Minerals

Essential minerals help the body maintain proper organ, heart and respiratory functions, as well as growth. They include sodium, potassium, chloride, magnesium, iodine, calcium, iron and plenty more. Sodium helps cells function normally and maintains fluid volume outside the body’s cells. However, there are issues with over-consumption, and the maximum you should consume per day is 2,400 milligrams, which is actually very small. Sodium is found in salt and seaweed. Potassium plays a key role in skeletal and smooth muscle contraction, meaning it is important for digestion and muscular function. It is also crucial to heart function and helps prevent blood pressure from rising with increased sodium intake. Bananas, potatoes and tomatoes are the best sources of potassium. Calcium is one of the most important minerals, and is one that people are familiar with from a young age because of the role it plays in healthy teeth and bones. But the importance of calcium goes beyond that, with just about every cell in the body using the essential mineral in some way. The nervous system, muscles, heart and bones all use calcium, and rich food sources include milk, cheese and yogurt.

P.S. Take a look at the 5 veggies that boost female metabolism and burn off lower belly fat.

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